Fall Steelhead

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Cold
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2008/07/31 15:26:58 (permalink)

Fall Steelhead

So after fishing more (and spending more on that fishing) this year than ever before, I'm thinking about trying my luck at fishing the Erie tribs for steelhead this fall.  I have 1-2 friends that might be interested in coming with me, but really, I dont have the slightest idea of what to expect once I get there, or "the way to do it".  I know the fishing end of it, equipment, bait, and technique, but do most people just do day trips?  Get up there the night before?  Get a room?  Spend a long weekend?  Also, many sources say it gets pretty crowded.  Are we talking like literally elbow to elbow every weekend from Oct-Dec and again from Feb-Apr?  Do most people just drive around to find a likely spot then pull over, walk down and fish?  Is there so much private stream that you really need to know someone in order to fish?

I guess I really just want to know if planning a day trip or overnighter is really worth it without making prior arrangements with lodging, parking, permission, etc.  With all the increased deer regulations where I usually hunt, the Game Commission has lost my business, which will free up my deer season, which I've heard is a good time to go up for steelhead, as most of the hunter/fishers are chasing whitetail instead of trout.  Finally, are there any state parks along the tribs?  If it would work, my ideal situation would be to just go up on like a friday night and pitch a tent and camp.
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    vinestbrew
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/07/31 16:37:10 (permalink)
    The type of trip you choose is entirely up to you. I live in Pittsburgh and do day trips. As the season progresses the more the fish get spread out and so do the crowds. There are plenty of places to fish without needing permission.
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    carpin05
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/07/31 18:48:21 (permalink)
    night fishing from the wall at walnut can be very good early in the season...
    lots of fish run at night!!!!!
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    Indiana Lou
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/07/31 21:05:12 (permalink)
    Cold, My suggestion for you would be find a good "crack dealer" and  go for it! It would be cheaper and less addictive than steelhead fishing!!!! Obviously just kidding. That is about finding the crack dealer. Steelhead fishing isn't as tough as we tend to make it. Whether you decide to fish with bait and spinning gear or flyrod and artificials might be your toughest decision. As far as finding places to fish, Folly's End off of Rte 98 is right on the creek and there is a camp ground right there. It's not a state park, but the gentleman that run's it is very accomodating. You'll learn something new each trip. And rest assured you will return!!    Lou
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    leadmen
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/07/31 22:15:13 (permalink)
    ya the itch is on i use spoons /roosters even twisters and ill even hook shad  do not use any lead just a hook sometimes a snap but i do a good job if they do not bite your doing someting wrong they have a huge belly to fill 
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    indsguiz
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/07/31 22:37:20 (permalink)
    Cold,
         Yes it can get crowded, especially at the easily accessable spots, and the well known spots.  The best days to go are tues-thurs.  Weekends can be pretty jammed.   If you live close a day or day & 1/2 trip may work. If you live further away then an overnight trip will leave you much better rested and able to fish longer.  There are plenty of accommodations in Erie ranging in price from 49.00 to over 250.00 per night.  There are also plenty of very good resturants.
         What you fish with isn't really important as long as you observe good fishing etiquette and if you are stumped ask questions.  Most people on the creeks will gladly share information as long as you are polite.  Now there are purists who swear by fly fishing and there's are bait casters who swear At fly fishermen.  Come up, try it, and join the exodus.

    Illegitimis Non carborundum
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    Cold
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/01 07:19:22 (permalink)
    Thank you everyone who's replied so far!  It sounds like this might be feasible after all, which is great.  So let's say I head up the night before and find a campground, then wake up really early and tear down.  When I go to fish, if I see a spot choked with people, can I travel a mile or so upstream where it's less crowded and still catch fish?  Or is it kind of like early trout season where the crowds are the best indicator of fish?
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/01 10:22:02 (permalink)
    Depends where you're at Cold.  A good bit of the fishing for steelhead is on privately owned property that's open to the public.  In many - not all - of the public access areas with parking, you can walk a pretty good distance to get away from the crowds till you find posted property.
     
    Usually by the end of November, the steelhead are pretty spread out especially on Elk or Walnut.  Crowds are not always the best indicator of big numbers of fish later in the season.  Crowds are a good indication of easy access, and many - including myself in my first few years of steelhead fishing - aren't real familiar with all the opportunities in Erie and so stick to the easy access areas.  Early in the season, the large concentrations of fish are usually in the lower ends of the bigger streams where the easy access is.  In many cases, like at the project waters on Walnut, and near the access at Elk, you'll be fishing over dozens - sometimes hundreds - of fish early in the season.  But, if you walk and look, you can often find smaller schools of fish that haven't been pounded by fishermen for days on end. 
     
     
     
    I've found some solitude, even in November, by checking out the angler maps here: http://www.fishusa.com/FishErie/Maps.asp
     
    Next, read the stream descriptions here: http://www.fishusa.com/FishErie/StreamDescriptions.asp
     
    Then, you'll have a pretty good idea of where you can fish and what's closed. 
     
    If you're in Erie this summer for walleyes or perch, and have a few hours at the end of the day, it would be well worth it to take these maps and do some driving and exploring to orient yourself a little bit with the streams. 
     
    This will be my 5th season fishing for steelhead, and there are still MANY areas open to public fishing that I don't even know about.  A lot of the fun, for me anyway, has been learning about these fish and finding them in places where there aren't a lot of other people.  Most of the areas I've found to fish have come from doing what I've suggested above, and not from talking to anyone or having anyone show me around.  If you're friends with an experienced steelhead fisherman, going along with them a time or three can really cut the learning curve down for you.  And if you really want some solitude, wait till winter.  The crowds are still moderate in December and pretty thin by January (if the streams haven't iced up yet).  The fish are more sluggish, and the fight doesn't compare to October, but most of the fish that will run are in the streams, so your opportunities for finding fish and solitude are much better. 
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    Cold
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/01 13:19:33 (permalink)
    Great info, r-squared!  I'll definitely be studying those links in the days and weeks to come!  Thanks so much.

    anadromus, yes, I'm fortunate enough to have a dad who loves to fish and taught me alot.  Nowadays, I heavily favor artificials over live bait, while he prefers to to a bottom rig and a float both with paste and/or live bait, but dad definitely gave me the tools I needed (equipment and mental) for a lifetime of fishing.  I tend to strongly avoid crowds around here (near Latrobe/Greensburg), even to the point of spending opening day of trout in bed, fishing lakes in late February when they're more like an algae margarita than water, and leaving and driving to a new spot if it gets crowded.

    Steelhead fishing, however will be a completely new thing for me.  I know I probably won't like the crowds, but I do realize that there's alot to be learned by observation, so I might try to find a small group my first time up, then after that, nose around in the afternoon and find quiet places for a return trip once I know a little more about the game.  I hope that the people really are friendly like some of you say, as that can sometimes mean the difference between an awesome day and a real fiasco.  I guess it's probably like any other big event...there's alot of really great folks there, but usually only the bad apples are loud enough to get noticed.

    I've been doing a bit of online windowshopping and I'm a little puzzled...it seems like as far as rods, people either go medium-heavy/fast-action or noodle.  Is this an accurate observation?  I'll probably go noodle, as I prefer ultralight fishing for everything around here, from panfish to bass to walleye, but it just seems there's no middle ground in steelhead rods.  Also, if I go noodle rod, I'm planning on just putting my ultralight reel onto it, will this be ok?  It's a Shimano Sahara 750.  I also plan on using 2-4# fluoro...if that's a viable option.

    As far as baits, it seems like most of the stuff my dad and I use for trout will apply to steelhead pretty seamlessly (for me, rooster tails, rapala F-3s in simple colors, Kastmasters, and Trout magnets.  for bait guys, minnies, maggots, etc.).  It also seems salmon eggs are a standby bait as well as...clusters?  sacs?  I'm not really familiar with what these are, other than hooking 3-4 fireballs on your hook.  Is this the idea?  I dont fly-fish (I'd love to learn, but don't really know anyone that knows what they're doing), so it'll be all spinning for me and while I normally prefer artificials, I'll probably use bait too, as I use artificials mainly for the added challenge...and I think Steelheading will be challenge enough for now!


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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/01 14:08:56 (permalink)
    Sounds like you're about set there Cold.  Bought a noodle rod in my 2nd season of steelheading, and have loved it.  Many good models from Fish USA at good prices.  Poor Richards also has a great selection.  Should have no trouble pairing it with the reel and line you describe.  You can get by with a regular rod, as I did for awhile, but the noodle makes everything - from casting, to drifting to fighting the fish - so much better.
     
    The streams in Erie are just like a cross section of any other large group as you describe.  Most fishermen I've encountered don't mind sharing a tip or two as long as you're not fishing in their back pocket. 
     
    I personally don't use many artificials, but it sounds like you've got the right stuff.  One thing, for me, that I found to be different from regular trout fishing is hook size.  After a few years, I've come to prefer a size 14 or 16 for shiners and an 18 or 20 for eggs.  With the eggs, you can buy egg sacs or a jar of single eggs.  Whereas you might put 3 or 4 fireballs on a hook, I prefer a single - once in awhile double - egg on that 18 or 20 hook.  My top bait by far has been shiners - emeralds or goldens don't really seem to matter.  Other than single eggs and shiners, I use a wax worm or two once in awhile or a mini foo jig tipped with a waxworm or maggots.  But I've seen people catch steel on literally everything you could imagine.  Just a matter of personal preference and what you've got confidence in. 
     
    There was a great post on here - on the Erie forum - called "The Basics."  I'd recommend doing a search for it and reading it and re-reading it.  It was very helpful.
     
    See you're from Latrobe.  You goin' to watch the Stillers practice tonight?  Thinking about heading down that way with the family.
    #10
    Cold
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/01 14:40:19 (permalink)
    I've been debating going to see them for a while now...as Camp is literally about 3 minutes away from me and I want to get a look at Mendenhall and Sweed's talent, but Training Camp, like first day of trout, usually draws a crowd I'd rather avoid. 

    I'll definitely look up the thread, and if I find it, probably link it here in case anyone else is getting any help from this thread.

    As far as the eggs, I'm guessing fireballs and the Mike's salmon eggs work?  I havent seen a jar of egg sacs but I've never really looked for them...I'll have to start.  If I fish fireballs, I normally do as you do, hooking one egg by itself on a little round egg hook, tied straight to the main line.  I was thinking 3 or 4 like that for making a sort of "egg sac" appearance...but apparently the bait company makes those sacs for us...how nice of them.

    Also it seems I'll need something better than the rubber hip boots I use in the Loyalhanna, for warmth and dryness as well as grip.  But that's down the road...for now, I'm just doing alot of reading and checking out maps.  I'll also be putting the bug in a few friends' ears.  Not many of them fish, but the ones that do are pretty hard core, I hope I can get a buddy to come with.  It'll cut the gas cost in half...

    For the first trip, I'm thinking a day trip in mid to late October, probably on a Saturday.  Take a long nap or go to bed early friday, then wake up around 2-3am, drive up and get there around 5-6, and be wetting line by 6:30-7.  For that trip, I dont know if I'll buy any steelhead specific equipment, depending on my normal gear to get the job done.  After that, assuming I enjoy myself, I'll probably get a decent noodle rod and a good set of insulated chest waders (maybe as an early christmas present if I'm good!  haha).
    #11
    Cold
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/04 12:23:28 (permalink)
    http://forums.fishusa.com/m_23220/mpage_2/key_/tm.htm

    That is the link to Danjae's Basics 2007 thread, also chock full of great information and tips.

    Over the weekend, I discussed the possibility of Steelheading with a buddy while fishing in his canoe and I've got a definite steelhead partner this fall! :)

    That brings me to the subject of gearing up, which is probably the funnest thing next to the actual fishing.  I've been checking local stores, and while there are several regular steelhead rods, I havent seen anything I'd really call a "noodle" rod.  I'd prefer to find one locally, but I may have to order one online.  Anyone know if Dicks or Gander Mtn. can get them in for you if you ask nicely?

    Attached to the noodle rod, I'll be transferring my Shimano Sahara 750 from my ultralight.  Though it will have line on it, I'm thinking of totally respooling for steelhead, with brand new line.  I started using 2# Vanish this year and have been 100% pleased with it thus far.  I plan to use it in the tribs too.  Does anyone know if they sell full sized spools of the 2#?  I've only ever seen the 110 yd. spools.  For fishing around here, I usually just get one spool and go with that, but if I cant find a larger spool of it, I'll probably just buy two spools and connect them.  Since it's 2# fluorocarbon, I don't plan on using any sort of leader or tippet.

    EDIT: Oh!  Also, since I have 2 spools for my reel, I'm thinking about spooling the other one with a high quality 6# line, just in case the Vanish craps the bed and I need something that'll resist breakoffs.  Good idea?

    For hooks, I'm thinking of just getting an assortment of tiny single, treble, and egg hooks.  Locally ahead of time if I can find em, up there is I cant.  Sizes from 12 to 22, though I don't really feel comfortable going much smaller than 16-18...if it'll help catch fish though, I'm willing to try anything.

    For bait, I'm thinking I'll probably only leave home with some fireballs, and get most of the rest up there.  We'll probably get a buffet of bait, including egg sacs, single eggs, waxies, maggots, and if I think to do a little reading on how to transport them and keep them alive, maybe a few small minnows.  I'll also be on the lookout for jigs, and to that end, anything that anyone suggests here will get special consideration.  Along with these, I'll be taking up my assortment of F-3 rapalas, rooster tails, little spoons, and trout magnets.  Now...what the heck is skein?

    For lead, I'll probably just bring up some small shot thats been hanging out in the tackle box for years.

    For floats, I'll get a pack of the Ez-trout floats...maybe 2 packs...and a few of the little round styrofoam floats with the built in weight on the bottom.  I think I have some colored Sharpies at home so I may try Danjae's suggestion. Also, I may go au natural and grab a few craft store mini-corks.  If it spooks them less, it'd be worth the effort.

    Other than that, all I think I need is waders, and they've got me a bit stumped.  The neoprene certainly LOOKS the warmest, but most neoprene sets I've seen have soft feet in them...how do you use these kinds of waders?  Just get a pair of cheap rubber boots and use the 'prene like a fat sock?  Or do they make special grippy bottoms for these?  I think this may be my biggest expense of the trip, so I'm gonna do alot of research on it.  What types do you guys like?

    post edited by Cold - 2008/08/04 12:34:17
    #12
    Ax
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/04 16:30:08 (permalink)
    Poor Richards in Erie will have all the single eggs and egg sacs you will need.  With just about anything else too.  They are open 24 hours once the Steel start running and they are very informative and reasonably cheap with all the prices.  FYI if you get shiners just ask for 1 dozen because they will give you way more than 12.
     
    Don't be afraid to wait and get bait off of them.  Plus Poor Richards is right in the middle of Walnut and Elk creek.
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    Deadbolt401
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/04 18:02:30 (permalink)
    ORIGINAL: Ax

    Poor Richards in Erie will have all the single eggs and egg sacs you will need.  With just about anything else too.  They are open 24 hours once the Steel start running and they are very informative and reasonably cheap with all the prices.  FYI if you get shiners just ask for 1 dozen because they will give you way more than 12.

    Don't be afraid to wait and get bait off of them.  Plus Poor Richards is right in the middle of Walnut and Elk creek.


    Someone light the fire!!!!!

    Do it, do it!
    #14
    Cold
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/04 18:29:59 (permalink)
    Light the fire?

    Anyway, It looks like I need to set aside at least $75 for good waders.  I think I'll get em with the boot already built onto them, and now I'm just debating on the breathable nylon stuff or the neoprene.

    I hate to wait until im actually there to get a rod, but I might end up doing it.  I'll take both of my usual workhorse rods along, just in case, though.  If we do a scouting trip in late sept. early oct. I can get it then, I suppose.

    It sounds like this Poor Richards is an amazing place.  I may have to just see if they rent rooms!
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    smallhook
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/04 21:29:53 (permalink)
    I just want a place to sleep and a warm bathroom for my morning crap.  If Gary at Poor Richards opened up a big garage with about twenty cots in it for $20 per night it would be full all season.  The hotel room price is what makes stelheading expensive.  That extra $60 per night makes a three day trip cost just that much more.
    #16
    Cold
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/07 17:51:32 (permalink)
    So does anyone have suggestions for a quality, inexpensive noodle rod?  I'm not looking to shell out for a Loomis, but I also know enough about the sport to know that the $10 rod definitely isn't what you want.  I've been browsing the big sporting goods stores' websites just to see what's out there (I'm actually considering buying from a local shop once I get up there, but I'm very leery of driving that far, and waiting that long, to get an essential piece of gear).  Does anyone know if I can...maybe like pre-order something, so it's waiting for me when I get there? 

    In any event, I'm looking to spend $40-100, with an ideal price around $60-80.  On cabelas website, they have only a rod or two specifically labelled as "noodle", but several that were like 9'-6" to 12'-6" light rods, designed for 2-8# line...I can't imagine that they're anything but noodle rods.  Among those, I found 5 that seemed promising.  One from Berkley (Air IM-7), two from Shimano (at least one was Convergence), and two others I cant remember (possibly a Fenwick and a Shakespeare).

    Can anyone offer some wholesome and realistic advice on what to look for in buying a rod, or any type of advice for or against a brand? 

    Also, I'd like to get one soon, and practice using it around here, in places where its not crowded, the pressure's off, and I'm already familiar with the water as well as the fish.  For example, I normally use a 5' ultralight with 2# line.  I know when I go to Twin Lakes or Mammoth that I don't have to be terribly gentle, as I can handle just about any fish in there, except maybe a few carp, when I go up to Conemaugh, I am usually a little more careful, because there's a pretty decent chance of hooking into a psychotic walleye or pike, not to mention fat hog largemouth.  I'd like to know how my rod will behave in the heat of the moment...know what I mean?


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    indsguiz
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/07 20:07:44 (permalink)
    Cold,
       For starters try calling the guys at Fish USA.  Their number is at the top of the home page.  If they don't have anything you want I'd try Poor Richards.  Last year PR's had a special that if you buy a rod you got a free hat.  Not much but it was free.  And they have noodles in many lengths and actions.  It seems between Fish Usa and PR's I've got noodles in 9', 9.5', 2ea @10' and 11'  I prefer 10'.  I do think your choice of line wt. is a little bit light.  I never go with less that 6# and I prefer 8#.  You're better able to get the fish "to net" quicker with heavier line.
       As for brand, ? ? ? ?  When I was starting out I figured I was going to break something so I went inexpensive.  Now I'm into moderately expensive.  But I still have my "cheap"  $45 rod and I like it better than some of the others.  Sooo, my advice is get a good cheap rod.  Get a good reel and spool it with 6# and learn, learn learn.
     
    BTW:  To equate hooking a steelie. Hook in to about a 20" carp and fight it on your gear.  If it breaks . .  too light.  Remember you will (probably) be fishing around many other people and there isn't a whole lot of room and if you want to "play" a fish for 15 minutes up and down thru a hole you won't be very popular.  Hook em', fight em' land em'  don't play with them.
    post edited by indsguiz - 2008/08/07 20:11:51

    Illegitimis Non carborundum
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    spoonchucker
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/07 21:14:45 (permalink)
    Cold,
     
    Fish USA, and Poor Richard's are excellent suggestions for your rod purchase. Dicks generally stock two models of noodle rod. One mid-low price, one upper end. As for line. Given your lack of experience, you should go with at least 4lb. preferabley 6lb. All 2lb. is going to do is result in many lost fish, or dead fish ( especially in the early season ) due to overplaying. I NEVER ( even in the clearest of conditions ) use less than 6lb line, or tippet, and my catch rate is comparable to, or above anyone's.

    Get Informed, Get Involved, And Make A Difference.

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    #19
    Stillhead
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/07 22:00:51 (permalink)
    http://www.fishusa.com/Cortland-Endurance-Noodle-Rods_p.html?i=B6006ABE0AF04664BB2ED6A5B8998787

    That rod in 10' 6" is a good choice.


    Also, if you want to experience these fish at their finest, come October - end of November, before it gets frigid cold. They are fun all the time, but when they are fresh from the lake and the water temps. are prime, they are an incredible fish.

    Don't even bother with the 2lb test, really, nothing good will come of it. Not saying you can't land them on it, just saying, nothing good will come. Go with 6 or even 8lb main line. When fishing single eggs in low clear water, or other small offerings, a 4lb leader might help, but allot of times 6 is plenty light enough, especially the high quality fluorocarbon leaders made now (not vanish, but Seaguar, Rio, Orvis Mirage, Blackbird,Umpqua, theres a bunch).  I fish Orivs mirage fluorocarbon leaders, 99% of the time in either 3x (9lb in that brand) or 4x (7lb in that brand). 3x refers to the diameter which is .008 inches,  which happens to be the same as 4lb berkley trilene (and probably Vanish but I'd have to check on that).

    You'l also be better off getting your eggs and egg sacks from the local tackle shops, they'll have fresh natural chinook salmon eggs which usually (but not always) work better than what you'll find jarred around here.

    Skein is also eggs, can either be salmon eggs or trout eggs,  it refers to immature eggs taken from fish that are kept. When the eggs are immature they are stuck together in a membrane, rather than loose single eggs. They are bloody and stinky, which make them great bait for dirty water (visibility less than a foot). It even works in clear water, but I do just fine (and many times better) with eggs sacks/singles when the water is clearer without the mess.

    Definitely bring the trout magnets, my favorite in clear water is gold glitter. Stained water white. They'll all work. If you can see the jig coming through the water, twitch it through without a float.  If you can't see it, use a small float, try to set it so it's at or just above the level of the fish.  You'll come acrossed large pods of fish, letting it sink down in them too far leads to foul hooked fish. Contrary to allot that you will read, these fish don't mind coming up in the water to strike. If you need to fish it down deep to get their attention, concentrate on the fish on the edges of the pod to minimize foul hooking/spooking fish.

    If you go to the stream with live minnows, jigs either marabou or trout magnets and eggs, you'll have something the fish want, now all you have to do is offer it to them in a way they want it.
    post edited by Stillhead - 2008/08/07 22:05:23
    #20
    spoonchucker
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/07 22:08:55 (permalink)
    Just leave the YANKee flys at home. Or in NY.

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    #21
    davef
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/07 22:13:40 (permalink)
    I agree you should check with fishusa and poor richards if you can but if you want to look at noodle rods now, check gander mt. I don't know about greensburg but johnstown had several different brands yesterday when i was there. It might be worth the drive.

    Your sahara 750 reel will work fine but you might want to try a larger size to balance the noodle rod better. I have a 4000 series shimano plus about 3 ounces of bottom bouncer epoxied into the rod butt to get it balanced.

    #22
    spoonchucker
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/07 22:19:35 (permalink)
    That's interesting Dave. I always found my 4000 series a bit TOO heavy for most noodle rods. May be a difference in leverage ( arm length ), fishing style, or just personal preference.

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    #23
    davef
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/07 22:27:23 (permalink)
    The noodle rod i have i believe is a south bend that was around $70 when i got it. To me it seemed tip heavy from the gitgo.

    With that much lead in the butt i can turn it into a weapon if the creeks get to crowded.
    #24
    Cold
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/08 00:02:11 (permalink)
    First off, another thank you to everyone who has taken the time to post here to help me out, it's appreciated more than you know.  Also its not the typical "go here, buy this, do that" help, but suggestions and explanations that allow me to think for myself too, which is the best kind of help. :)

    For the line first: I guess the 2# was just because thats what I use here and I love it, but I also understand that if we had steelhead around here, I probably wouldn't be using 2# for them, so I'm certainly not dead set on it.  Still, I'm not really keen on tying leaders on, and will probably just go with a 4-6# fluoro line, sans leader unless there's some really compelling reason to use it.  I dont know why, but I've pretty much always hated fussing with leaders, and if they'd give me trouble up there, I'd be extremely disgusted, so I'll probably use a high quality line with the hook tied directly to it.  On that note, can anyone suggest a great fluoro line that I can get in 4-6#, and fill a spool for under $20?

    As far as the rod: I totally forgot to mention that I've also checked out FishUSA's selection in-depth...I just completely forgot to mention them while posting.  In fact the Cortland Endurance was the most promising one I saw on the site!

    davef, I've been stopping at Gander Mtn. at least once a week on my way home from work since...February?  Either to resupply fishing consumables (power bait, fireballs, etc.) or see if there's anything good on sale.  Been checkin for noodles for around a month...no dice at the greensburg site. Thanks for the reel advice too, but as it stands, it's the 750 or the quantum baitcaster I use for bass...I'm gonna be shelling out enough as is, just one gas, rod, and waders.  If I decide to make steelheading a permanent part of my fall-winter schedule, I might get a reel just for my noodle rod, but for now, it's the 750.

    When it comes to bait, I will definitely buy locally.  Anywhere that you can get local bait, I usually try to do so.  It helps.  Alot.

    Thanks for explaining skein...the internets didn't really know for sure what it was...sounds like typical bait: something stinky and disgusting that came from something equally stinky and disgusting...and the fish love it like prime rib.  It's also nice to hear that there's a place for trout magnets.  Those and Rapalas were really my MVP lures this year so far, and it'll be good to have something familiar.  In fact, I landed a spunky footlong rainbow just today with a mealworm gold TM (released unharmed and very healthy) as well as a fat smallmouth on a pink one.

    spoon...what's a yankee fly?  I wouldnt want to accidentally bring one and make you mad!
    #25
    Deadbolt401
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/08 01:08:17 (permalink)
    ORIGINAL: Cold

    Light the fire?

    Anyway, It looks like I need to set aside at least $75 for good waders.  I think I'll get em with the boot already built onto them, and now I'm just debating on the breathable nylon stuff or the neoprene.

    I hate to wait until im actually there to get a rod, but I might end up doing it.  I'll take both of my usual workhorse rods along, just in case, though.  If we do a scouting trip in late sept. early oct. I can get it then, I suppose.

    It sounds like this Poor Richards is an amazing place.  I may have to just see if they rent rooms!



    Only kidding, each year there's debates on Poor Richards and other bait stores in the area. I was making a joke, and apparently, I'm not funny.

    not much else to say, I know Follys end Bait shop has some alright Noodlers on sale for 30-40$$.

    I've bought 2 there last year when i closed them in the car door.
    #26
    Stillhead
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/08 05:52:45 (permalink)
    If you've had luck with Vanish, then give it a shot, just go for 4 ot 6 lb.  It's been years since I've tried it, maybe it's improved since then.   
     
    I fish for years with 4lb Berkley trilene, tied straight to the lure/hook and caught many fish, so you don't have to have a leader. I do believe it gets a few more strikes though. Maybe a confidence thing more than anything.
     
     
     
    The "yankee fly" was an inside joke.   It's what many of the "salmon fisherman" use from other states, where there are runs of Chinook salmon. They toss a fly out and yank....  they are all using "yankee flys".
    #27
    indsguiz
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/08 10:06:26 (permalink)
    Yankee Fly Fishing is more common than you would think and even occurs on the tribs.  It will get you a nice fine if you are caught.  If you see a person who is constantly tossing a fly out right in front of a fish and then almost immediately ripping the line through the water they are trying to get the line to go in the fishes' mouth (or close to the head) so they can snag the fish on the retrieve.  This is also calld "lining".  Keep your eyes open and I'm sure you will se it often.  Just don't do it.   Please.
         Anoher "trick" is to camouflage a big treble hook with some yarn and do the same thing.   Just remember the golden rule:  If it isn't hooked in the mouth (or very close) it could cost you some gold.

    Illegitimis Non carborundum
    #28
    Cold
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/08 11:56:16 (permalink)
    That's horrible! 

    I accidentally jabbed a sucker that I couldn't see hanging out on the bottom yesterday and felt bad about it!  It didn't snag him, but it still probably didn't feel great catching a hook in his side...

    I'm by and large a C&R guy, though I have no problem keeping fish, or with others keeping their catch, I just normally throw them back, and snagging fish is a pretty lousy thing to do.

    No new developments in this neck of the woods.  Possibly maybe considering a Cabela's trip in the next week or three, but that's a nebulous idea at best and a pipe dream at worst, what with the cost of gas...besides a trip to Wheeling could, just as easily be rotated 90 degrees north and be a trip to Erie!
    #29
    spoonchucker
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    RE: Fall Steelhead 2008/08/08 15:56:00 (permalink)
    Cast fly, drift fly, YANKEE fly. I have watched guys get a "hit" on every drift this way.

    Get Informed, Get Involved, And Make A Difference.

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    GL
    #30
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