Conehead Triple Threat

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SilverKype
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RE: Conehead Triple Threat 2010/03/29 13:14:04 (permalink)
Polar fiber is fanastic to work with. I try to tie clousers with it for when the water is clear. Certainly breaths better than deer hair. Nice Tut Dan.

My reports and advice are for everyone to enjoy, not just the paying customers.
#31
jah1317
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RE: Conehead Triple Threat 2011/10/14 11:30:57 (permalink)
I got some off brand synthetic hair from a place called the fly tyers dungeon, nice materials tons of colors,and CHEAP!!! I actually have some EP fiber (the real stuff) and they are comprable. I try not to promote others especially with such an awesome sponsor for this site but they do not have this type of material. By the way AWESOME tute!
#32
woodnickle
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RE: Conehead Triple Threat 2011/11/09 19:40:30 (permalink)
Saw this and thought it would work in the lagoons..:)





     
TRIPLE THREAT Articulated Leech




 




By definition, the articulated leech is two or more flies, joined to make one long, wiggly, artificial. The size in itself is enough to draw attention, but its lifelike swimming motion adds a degree of realism that drives fish nuts. Most often, it's tied in black, but various colors and flashy materials can also be used to create the ultimate attractor.
For increased motion on the triple, you can add weight to the head of the first fly, the tail of the second fly, and the head of the third fly. For a double, add weight to the head of the first, and tail of the second. When you fish them with a strip retrieve, they bend at the joints, and then straighten with a strip, resulting in a swimming leech.





 



Materials:
  1. Hooks - Size 4 long-shank streamer

  2. Thread - Heavy black, e.g. Danville Monocord or Flymaster Plus.

  3. Head - Weighted Conehead. (Optional)

  4. Underbody material - .020 to .030 lead wire. (Optional)

  5. Joint - 30 # monofilament

  6. Body - Stripped Rabbit, black

  7. Gill - Rabbit hair or similar material, red

  8. Body Flash - Flashabou, black. (Optional)



TYING STEPS:
REAR Fly
  1. Cover the shank of the hook with tying thread to form a base.
  2. Tie in the lead wire halfway back from the eye, then wrap the forward one-half of the shank. Using thread, thoroughly wrap the lead to secure.
  3. Tie in small clump of Flashabou at the bend, leaving one-inch extending rearward past the bend as a tail.
  4. Tie in a long piece of stripped rabbit near the bend leaving one inch extending rearward past the bend as a tail. Move thread to the head. Wrap the rabbit strip forward around the shank to just behind the eye. Place 3 or 4 wraps of thread over the rabbit, cut and remove excess.
  5. Place multiple wraps of thread over the cut end of the rabbit behind the eye. Whip finish and cement.








MIDDLE Fly


  1. Repeat step 1 from rear fly.
  2. Tie in a 2-3 inch long piece of 30# monofilament from the eye to the bend with the excess extending rearward. Place multiple wraps of thread over the mono to secure it.
  3. Thread monofilament through the eye of the rear fly, and then bring the excess mono forward forming a loop. Tie down with 5 or 6 wraps near the bend along the top of the shank.
  4. Pull the mono forward through the wraps to draw the rear fly near the tail of the middle fly. (Approx. one-eighth inch loop) Bring the mono forward along the top of the shank to near the eye. Tie off near the eye, cut and remove excess mono.
  5. Apply a few drops of super-glue, or Zap-A-Gap along the entire length of the shank, then firmly wrap with thread to secure the mono to the shank.
  6. Repeat step 2 of rear fly, except, place lead wire on rear one-half of the shank.
  7. Repeat step 3 of rear fly.
  8. Repeat step 4 of rear fly.
  9. Repeat step 5 of rear fly.

FRONT FLY


  1. Place weighted conehead on shank.
  2. Repeat step 1 of rear fly.
  3. Repeat step 2 of middle fly.
  4. Repeat step 3 of middle fly. (Eye of middle fly)
  5. Repeat step 4 of middle fly.
  6. Repeat step 5 of middle fly.
  7. Repeat step 3 of rear fly.
  8. Repeat step 4 of rear fly.
  9. Tie in a small clump of red rabbit for gills along each side of the shank behind the conehead. Place multiple wraps of thread to secure.
  10. Whip finish and cement.

#33
HCsteel
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RE: Conehead Triple Threat 2011/11/09 19:53:30 (permalink)
One thing I would change in that tutorial Mika is fireline instead of mono, mono is a terrible joint material.
#34
ray126
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RE: Conehead Triple Threat 2011/12/09 23:46:24 (permalink)
mika,
I will definitely tie some for smallies
#35
Plum Bob
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RE: Conehead Triple Threat 2012/02/28 10:48:03 (permalink)
Cone head triple threat. Try this with Finn racoon under fur or icelandic sheep instead of polar fiber/ craft fur. Greatly reduces the snarling, tangling properties encountered when using synthetic hair like polar fiber, yet still gives you a soft hair, lively fly with the right shape, profile.
#36
FishinGuy
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Re: RE: Conehead Triple Threat 2014/08/23 19:11:24 (permalink)
Not to resurrect a long dead thread... But I've been whipping some of these up lately and have a couple questions. im fairly new to tying and I own fairly few tying materials and I've been using craft fur. Is that the same or close enough to polar fiber? I only have 3 colors so most of them have been all white and colored with marker. I've found when doing just one color its easier for me to just use one big clump and spin it around the hook evenly by making a couple loose wraps and spinning it as I tighten. Are the 4 clumps crucial to the profile? I've also done a few with bead heads. I think they came out pretty nice but I don't feel the pop when it goes in. I'll try to post a couple pics for your critiques if I can get them to come out.
post edited by FishinGuy - 2014/08/24 08:44:47
#37
Plum Bob
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Re: RE: Conehead Triple Threat 2014/08/24 09:19:17 (permalink)
Top one looks good. Pic #2 tied too thick. Fly is best tied fairly sparse.  Bead works but fly looks better with a cone. 2 or 3x long hook, size 6 or 8, size small cone. Lots of on line fly shops carry polar fiber. White belly with gray or olive back, some pearl flash along sides is a good Erie shiner pattern.  I tie this with a finn raccoon wing and rabbit hair throat, 6-8 strands pearl firefly flash. Very good Erie trib. fly.
#38
FishinGuy
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Re: RE: Conehead Triple Threat 2014/08/24 13:24:03 (permalink)
Thanks for the insight. The second pic was the first one I tied. I thought it might be too thick also. I tried the beads because I didnt have smaller cones. The one with a cone head is a 6 and the bead heads are 8s
#39
doubletaper
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Re: RE: Conehead Triple Threat 2014/08/26 18:51:36 (permalink)
what Plum Bob said. tie them sparse and white on the bottom.

http://streamsidetales.bl...015/05/helles-yea.html
it's not luck
if success is consistent 





#40
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